Cameron County PA

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Sunday, February 19, 2017

Sargento Expands Recall of Select Cheeses

Sargento Expands Recall of Select Cheeses 

 Please visit this link for recalled cheese and updated Sargento information

Monday, February 13, 2017

Chili Cook Off Results


Mike Travis, middle, 1st Place Winner 

Chili Cook-off Benefits Emporium Moose Kids Christmas Cameron County Inaugural Chili Cookoff Benefit winners announced. Crazy Eyes BBQ (Mike Travis) took first with a smoked brisket chili, second place went to Kurt Ripple, with his famous Kersey Chili, and Dorothy Hastings highlighted her chili with beer. The three earned top votes among 10 competitors. 

The proceeds were given to the Emporium Moose Lodge 368 for Christmas for Kids. The event held at My Place was in conjunction with the Winter Fest. The temperatures Saturday, combined with the sun and little snow base forced the cancellation of the outdoor activities at the Emporium Country Club. 

“The chamber was pleased that Jody Martin from My Place wanted to expand the outdoor festivities and give adults something to do,” said Tina Johns Solak, executive director of the Cameron County Chamber of Commerce. Friday night was the beer and pretzel gala featuring Straub and Coors products with the chili cook-off ending the event on Sunday afternoon.

Kyra Azzato Heads to Infantry Officer Course, Combat Training

She's from Cameron County and this lady is ready for an amazing future. Congratulations Kyra! 
Your hometown is proud of you!


Please read the article complete with pictures by clicking on this link to Syracuse University News


Kyra Azzato ’17 will become the first woman from Syracuse University—and among the first few in the nation—to attend Infantry Basic Officer Leader Course. For Kyra Azzato ’17, looking back on it, the vision really began on the day she arrived at Syracuse University to join the Army ROTC battalion. It was built upon the officers and teachers in charge of the program. She studied the way they supervised cadets, the concern and command they always showed during training in the field.

It led to an aspiration that seemed impossible. Azzato listened as many of her friends spoke of their plans once they left college, how they intended to “branch infantry,” the expression for going into combat arms.

While Azzato wanted the same thing, she could do little more than wish out loud. American women were barred from taking that step. In the 98-year history of Army ROTC on the Syracuse campus, no woman graduate had ever been allowed to go into combat training.

Until now.

In three months, Azzato will be commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Army infantry. She will become the first woman from Syracuse University—and among the first few in the nation—to attend what’s known IBOLC, or Infantry Basic Officer Leader Course. Eventually, she will go on to Army Ranger school.

The task will involve a gantlet of mental and physical challenges. If everything works out, she could accomplish her dream: She could become leader of an Army platoon that might someday be called into combat.

Azzato “This doesn’t surprise me,” says Xavier Whitehead, who was a master sergeant at Syracuse when Azzato arrived. “I could see the potential early on.”

Azzato, in all ways, downplays her own achievements. But her officers and teachers aren’t so restrained. They note how she carried a 3.8 GPA into her final semester as a senior, how she is pursuing a dual major in broadcast and digital journalism in the Newhouse School of Public Communications and political science in the College of Arts and Sciences and the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, and how she has never missed a semester on the dean’s list.

She accomplished all of that while excelling at her ROTC duties.

“I’ve been teaching for years, and I can’t say I’m in awe of many students, but I’m in awe of her,” says Associate Professor Suzanne Lysak, Azzato’s advisor in the Newhouse School.

Making her achievements all the more remarkable: Until the end of her senior year of high school, Azzato wasn’t even aware of ROTC. That changed quickly, once she was accepted in the program. At Syracuse, she began a quick ascent through leadership positions, from team leader as a freshman to battalion commander as a senior. Along the way, she became aware of a simple, aching truth:

“Everyone knew it,” she says. “My heart was in combat arms.”

To make history, Azzato had to be in the right place at the right time. In December 2015, then-Secretary of Defense Ash Carter announced that women would be eligible for combat jobs in every branch of the military. While many servicewomen had already experienced combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, this was the first time they would be officially eligible to fight—and potentially to lead a combat platoon.

Azzato approaches the opportunity with appreciation, and humility. She knows other female cadets who came before her at Syracuse might have made the same decision, if they’d had the chance.

But Whitehead, the master sergeant she describes as a life-changing influence, says her personality is built for this kind of challenge.

“She’s very determined, and so focused, and she definitely has a wherewithal, a tenacity,” says Whitehead, now in Texas. “She has a focus and a vision, a very long view of things when most people have a very short view of things.”

He remembers when the Syracuse cadets were doing a field training exercise on a raw and snowy day. They were at Fort Drum in the North Country, moving through the woods, when “Azzato caught a branch in the eye,” Whitehead says. The injury might have caused many young people to go back to the base.

“She slapped a patch on it,” says Whitehead, who watched with admiration as she finished the exercise. Cadet Mitchell Alan Hovis, a senior who also intends to “branch infantry,” says he and his friends, from that point on, began calling her “Patchy.”

It was a nickname built upon respect. When there’s a problem, Hovis says, Azzato “won’t just step back and watch. She wants to be in there, fixing it.” He remembers her disappointment when women remained ineligible for combat training, and her joy at the news when that situation changed.

Whitehead often speaks of her tenacity and resilience. Azzato, in turn, credits her officers and mentors with inspiring those qualities. She says there was such a power to the camaraderie and friendship within ROTC that it caused her to embrace the ideals of the infantry.

“For me, it’s the individual people I see every day,” she says. “I fell in love with taking care of my cadets.”

She expressed particular gratitude toward Whitehead. The master sergeant influenced her life, she says, as much as anyone she’s ever met.

“He’s not an easy person to please, but he makes you want to be a better person, in and out of the Army,” she says. “He never lets you settle for anything less than excellent.”

She remembers the moment she arrived at Syracuse, a teenager wearing civilian clothes, with no real idea of what ROTC would entail. She remembers the jolt of that first day, when she picked up her uniform. She remembers when Whitehead unexpectedly made her class leader, sensing something in her she had yet to find herself.

There is an old tradition, a high honor, on the day you are commissioned: You offer a “first salute” to an officer with particular meaning in your life.

This May, when that day comes for her in Syracuse, Azzato hopes Whitehead will be there.

That patient drive, that “long view of things,” began early. Azzato grew up in Emporium, Pennsylvania, and attended Cameron County High School. She is the oldest child of Bret Martz, a corporal with the Pennsylvania State Police, and Kara Martz, who works at a school for children with high needs.

For Azzato, the idea of looking out for others was a way of life: Throughout her childhood, her parents often cared for foster children.

At school, she was an honors student who ran track, played basketball, served on the debate team and somehow found time for a job, waiting tables. Her long-term plan, until her senior year, was becoming a journalist. When the deadline neared for choosing a college, many of her friends chose to stay close to home. Azzato went online and discovered Syracuse University and the Newhouse School.

She was accepted. She needed to come up with the tuition.

A stranger at a track meet gave her a key to the solution. She had just finished running a race when a man by the fence called to her and says: “You run well. You ought to think about joining ROTC.” Azzato thought about his words. She went home, studied what Army ROTC offered and decided to apply.

She can tell you the exact moment when she learned of the response: Her mother was cooking dinner, and she was sitting at a kitchen counter, when she opened a letter informing her she’d earned a scholarship.

people in military uniforms Kyra Azzato with military members in Morocco It was a turning point. Almost five years later, in a low-key and steady way, she is about to make history at Syracuse.

“Throughout our time in ROTC, we learn about the different branches” of the Army, Azzato says. Every cadet must choose a path to follow upon being commissioned. One day, Sgt. 1stClass Ryan Jensen asked her which way she was leaning.

“To be honest,” she says, “if I could do it, I’d branch infantry.”

Once the rules changed, Azzato made that choice.

She understands the nature of that decision. She will confront formidable challenges, including a requirement to “ruck” for miles at a fast pace, carrying a heavy pack. “A lot of people are skeptical of a woman branching combat arms,” she says.

Her response is to do everything she can to be prepared. When she arrived at Syracuse three years ago, Cadet Julissa Myers was battalion commander. Azzato was impressed by Myers’ presence, by the confidence and respect she inspired in her fellow cadets.

It was a quick lesson in what hard work and discipline could achieve.

s Kyra Azzato receives the German Armed forces proficiency badge from a German colonel. Before long, Azzato realized the core elements of the infantry appealed to her. Lt. Col. Jason Warner, the officer in charge of Army ROTC at Syracuse, says Azzato has a unique set of leadership qualities. He remembers when the Syracuse Army ROTC did a joint training exercise at Cornell University, and Azzato was in charge of 100 cadets.

“She’s a very strong person,” he says. “She’s chosen a path that will challenge her. But she’s demonstrated that she has the skill and talent to meet that challenge.”

Lysak, her advisor at Newhouse, recalled when Azzato would routinely show up at 6:30 a.m. for a 7 a.m. course. She described Azzato as one of the most organized people she’s ever. Most important, Lysak says, Azzato is a “natural leader,” a student who quietly exudes a strong presence in the classroom yet listens intently to what other students say.

“She is a person who has strong judgement, but also always seeks out guidance,” Lysak says. “She’s just a terrific young woman, and I’m very proud of her.”

Beyond her double majors, Azzato can also speak three languages, including Arabic. She has traveled for ROTC summer training programs to Jordan and Morocco. Her plan is no longer to find a job in journalism: She expects to spend her career in the Army, which is why she was so pleased to learn that Whitehead—her first master sergeant at Syracuse—hopes to be here on graduation weekend in May.

Warner says 24 Syracuse University Army cadets—including nine women—hope to be commissioned. Azzato, with her eyes set on a milestone, intends to turn and offer Whitehead that “first salute.” As she prepares for combat training, a challenge no other woman graduate in Syracuse University history has ever faced, Azzato says Whitehead helped provide her with this simple confidence:

“Whatever happens,” Azzato says, “this is what I’m meant to do.”

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Joseph R. Gibbs


Joseph R. Gibbs, 72, of 226 Arch Drive, Emporium, PA died at his residence, Emporium, PA on Saturday (February 11, 2017) night. He was born October 22, 1944 in St. Marys, PA a son of the late William B. and Helen Koczwara Gibbs, Sr. On November 28, 1969 in Farmers Valley, PA he married Kathi Mullin Gibbs, who survives.

 Joe and Kathi were married over 47 years. He graduated from Cameron County High School in the class of 1964. He served his country during the Vietnam Era, for four years, with the U.S. Navy. Joe often shared his service memories of both home and abroad. He had witnessed many changes in his 37 years of employment at GKN in Emporium. 

In addition to his wife Kathi he is survived by two sons, Kirk (Jill) Gibbs; Brett Gibbs & (Cheryl), both of Emporium; three grandchildren: Kierra (Jason) Schwab, Alora (Justin Farren) Gibbs and Jennifer Gibbs; three great grandchildren and another to join the family soon. One sister, Shirley Dippold, St. Marys and a brother, William Gibbs, Jr.; three nieces and he also leaves behind Kevin, Rose, Zachary & Jeremy Learn of Erie 

He was preceded in death by his parents, William B. and Helen Koczwara Gibbs, Sr.

 Memorial Service will be held at the Barnett Funeral Home, 207 E. Fourth Street, Emporium, PA on Saturday (February 18, 2017) at 3:00 PM with his sister-in-law, Debb Lee, officiating. 

Military services will be accorded by the Cameron County Memorial Detail following the service. 

The family will receive friends from 1:00 PM - 2:45 PM , Saturday at the Barnett Funeral Home. In lieu of flowers, Memorial Contributions may be made to Cameron County SPCA, 678 South Mountain Rd., Emporium, PA 15834 or to the Emporium Volunteer Fire Department, 419 N. Broad St., Emporium, PA 15834

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Shirley L. Priest


Shirley L. Priest, 86, of 6845 Beechwood Rd., Emporium, PA died at UPMC-Altoona Hospital, Altoona, PA Friday (February 10, 2017) night. She was born December 23, 1930 in Knox, PA a daughter of the late Robert L. and Grace Shepherdson Wenner. On June 7, 1954 in Emporium, PA she married Donald R. Priest, who survives.

Shirley was the oldest of 14 siblings. She helped raise her brothers and sisters in her early years. She retired, after many years of work, from Sylvania in Emporium. After retirement she went to work, working five years at Sheetz. She enjoyed canning and was always doing things for other people. She also enjoyed being with family and especially spending time with her grandchildren who gave her great pleasure and enjoyment. She like playing bingo and her get-together's with her former coworkers. She looked forward to family functions, weddings and anniversaries.

In addition to her husband Donald R. Priest she is survived by a son, Dana Priest, Truman, PA; daughter, Kathy (Martin) Tully, Thompson, PA; son, Curt (Janine) Priest, Eldred, PA; three grandchildren: Ryan Tully, Meghan (John) Prunier, and Kayla Priest, and two great grandchildren: Kendra Priest and Shaye Prunier. Three brothers, Vivion (Wimp) Wenner, Medina, NY; Robert (Linda) Wenner, Mt. Jewett; Donald (Linda) Wenner, St. Marys and six sister, Shelba Roselli, Georgia; Betty (Dave) DeGray, Florida; Beverly Wenner, Florida; Barbara (Dan) Paget, Johnsonburg; Velma (Bernard) Norlin, Johnsonburg; Sandy (David) Thorwort, Johnsonburg; sister-in-law, Harriet Wenner, Smethport and several, nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her parents, Robert L. and Grace Shepherdson Wenner, two brothers, Darwin and John Wenner, two sisters, Linda Kilhoffer and one in infancy,

Funeral Service will be held at the Barnett Funeral Home, 207 E. Fourth Street, Emporium, PA on Tuesday (February 14, 2017) at 1:00 PM with Rev. Christine Groeger, officiating.

Visitation will be at the Barnett Funeral Home one hour prior to the Service.
 Burial will be in the Newton Cemetery, Emporium, PA 

Memorial Contributions may be made to Cameron County SPCA, 678 South Mountain Rd., Emporium, PA 15834 

Online Condolences may be placed at www.BarnettFuneralHome.net
 BARNETT FUNERAL HOME, Inc. entrusted with arrangements.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Valentine's Weekend at Sinnemahoning State Park

Valentine's Weekend at Sinnemahoning State Park

 On Saturday, February 11, from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM, Sinnemahoning State Park offers the chance to do something fun and affordable with the people you love. This Valentine's Weekend grab the one or ones you love most for a day at Sinnemahoning State Park. Park staff will be offering two engaging programs for people to unplug and reconnect with nature and each other. 

 From 9:00 to 10:00 AM, have Coffee With the Birds. Enjoy a cup of coffee, tea, or cocoa, INDOORS, as you learn about the birds visiting the feeders just outside the classroom window.

 From 10:00 AM to 12:00 Noon, join park staff for a fun lesson in the popular sport of cross-country skiing. All equipment, including skis, poles, and boots (adult sizes) will be provided. In addition to the scheduled programs, the park will be offering several self-guided activities for couples and families to do both in the park and the PA WILDS. Build a snowman, make a s'more, snowshoe the trails, or tackle a puzzle; it's up to you to pick and choose. The park will provide all the information and tools, you create the fun!

 So join Sinnemahoning State Park on Saturday, February 11, 2017 from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM and enjoy a day (or more) in the heart of the PA WILDS!

 For more information or to pre-register for the cross country skiing class, please contact the Park Office at 814-647-8401. If you need an accommodation to participate in PA State Park activities due to a disability, please contact the park you plan to visit. With at least three days' notice, interpreters for people who are deaf or hard of hearing are available for educational programs.

Cameron County Community Chest 2017 Fund Drive Feb. Update

Cameron County Community Chest 2017 Fund Drive Feb. Update

 As of February 2 nd we have collected $8,683 toward our $20,500 goal. Thanks to all who have contributed. We will keep the 2017 Fund Drive open until September 30, 2017. This month’s featured organization will be the American Red Cross. 

  The American Red Cross PA Heartland Chapter is a humanitarian organization, led by volunteers, that provides relief to victims of disasters and helps people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies. The chapter is responsible for hosting local blood drives each year that replenishes blood used at our local hospitals. The chapter also provides all emergency communications between the men and women of the armed forces and their local families. The PA Heartland Chapter covers all of Cameron and Jefferson counties and most of Elk and Clearfield counties. Contact the chapter at 1-800- REDCROSS, by email at info@arcpaheartland.org, or visit us at www.arcpaheartland.org 

 No donation/memorial is too small. Please send your tax-deductible contribution to: Cameron County Community Chest, PO Box 134, Emporium, PA. 15834, Attn: Judd Schager. Help to support the Recreation Board, Community Nurses, Red Cross, Friends of the Library, the Package Team, and the Garden Club.

No Snow Means No Winter Festival this Weekend

No Snow Means No Winter Festival this Weekend 

 Cameron County Chamber of Commerce cancelling the Winter Festival planned for Saturday February 11 at the Emporium County Club. Executive Director Tina Johns Solak blamed the deluge of rain washing away the snow to just a thin layer. “It is not possible to have sleds using the golf course when only a thin layer of snow protects the fairways,” explained Johns Solak. This is the second year in the row the chamber and Emporium Country Club have canceled the events due to a lack of snow.

 Adults can spend President’s Day weekend in Emporium at My Place. The establishment will kick off Friday with a beer and pretzel gala. Craft breweries will be hand offering samples of their brew. Sunday afternoon a county wide chili cook off will be held. More than 7 competitors will battle for bragging rights. Both of those events planned in conjunction with the Winter Festival.

Rotary News



Qualified and properly trained workers are a valuable commodity in today’s job marketplace. That economic reality is even more true for much of north central Pennsylvania, where years of population loss has depleted the workforce and the areas younger generation has been drawn away to urban communities due to increased career opportunities.

Amy Goode, the new education program director for the Community Education Council (CEC) of Elk and Cameron Counties, discussed a program designed to reverse that trend with Emporium Rotary members. The Discover Partnership is an initiative designed to connect businesses, schools and community organizations through on-the-job training, internships, apprenticeships, new degree programs and non-credit training courses. Between 2000 and 2010, Cameron and Elk counties led the state in population decline. Cameron’s population fell by about 15 percent, while Elk’s dropped by close to 10 percent.

A large number of those residents left during the economic downturn that began in 2008. Many of the industries adversely affected by that recession have now rebounded, but the workers who left haven’t returned. Goode said that good paying jobs are out there, but many local businesses can’t fill them. “We need to educate our students and make them aware that good jobs are out there, and not just in entry-level positions,” Goode said. “There's a misconception that there are no quality jobs, or that you need a four-year degree and that's not true." Discover Partnership has already made several in-roads in Cameron County.

•Organizers have planned student tours of local companies, “educator in the workplace” events to allow teachers to observe local workplace settings, and job shadowing.

•CEC currently operates a computer lab next to the Pa. CareerLink offices at the Emporium Forging facility in Emporium. Classes and workshops are offered dealing with social media, computer operating systems and other areas of technology.

•Cameron County High School students are participating in a “Career Connect” program introducing them to careers and walking them through mock interviews with local employers.

•Curriculum options have been expanded to include involvement in Junior Achievement, career fairs, vocational research, writing classes and independent living courses..

In addition, the CEC offers college courses through Gannon, Pitt-Bradford and Penn State Dubois, as well as certification testing, GED instruction and professional development coursework. "This area has so much to offer, but we need to make sure our young people know what's out there," Goode said. "These programs can help give them a clear career plan." For more information on the Discover Partnership or other CEC programs, contact Amy Goode at 814-781-3437 or visit the website, discoverpartnership.org.

A limited number of tickets ($30.00) are still available for the Rotary Wine & Cheese Fundraiser February 18th which funds the Rotary Academic & Technical Scholarships. Must be 21 to attend. See Becky Pasquinelli at Northwest Bank or any Rotarian for tickets

New Horizons Healthy Foods

Just a reminder from New Horizons Healthy Foods that there will be a plant based potluck at the Aroma Cafe in Emporium,Pa on Sunday Feb. 12th. at 4 pm. 

We are defining plant based here as food containing no meat, fish, dairy or eggs. Please bring a dish if you can if not still come and check out how awesome this food can be. 
Hope to see you there!

A Very Friendly Grouse!

A friend of mine was out hunting bobcats the other day. Much to his surprise he had some company he couldn't shake. I've never seen anything like this before, and I don't believe he had either.
 In Cameron County #LoveOurCounty!


video

Cameron County Food Pantry

The Cameron County Food Pantry will hold a distribution for people determined eligible on Wednesday, February 22, 2017, from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. in the building located behind the Northern Tier Community Action offices at 135 West Fourth Street in Emporium.

Call 486-1161, ext. 269, with any questions.

Donna L. Williams


Donna L. Williams, 49, of 1019 Plank Road Hollow, Emporium, PA died at her residence on Tuesday (February 7, 2017) afternoon. She was born October 21, 1967 in DuBois, PA a daughter of Mary Ellen Plaszenski Walters, Emporium and the late Richard Celinski

Donna graduated from Cameron County High School in the class of 1985. She had worked several years for Teletron in Erie before returning to Emporium. She was a devoted mother and was always laughing and smiling wherever she went.

 She is survived by her Mother, Mary Ellen Walters; Step-Father, Theodore Walters; son, Corey Dean Williams; sister, Jeanette (Tom) Tiemissen; two brothers, Ted L. (Julie) Walters, all of Emporium and Daniel B. Walters, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Donna was preceded in death by her father, Richard Celinski and a brother, Scott Walters.

There will be No Visitation.

Relatives and friends are invited to attend a Memorial Service to be held at the Barnett Funeral Home, 207 E. Fourth Street, Emporium, PA on Monday at 11:00 AM with Rev. Christine Groeger, officiating.

Sunday, February 5, 2017

ERIE DIOCESE REFUGEE NEEDS

St Mark Church 

 ERIE DIOCESE REFUGEE NEEDS

With winter upon us, Catholic Services are again seeking donations of the following items to aid the many refugees being sheltered in Erie.

Items may be placed on the large table at the rear of the church.

Household Supplies: Cooking pans, silverware, plates, bowls, glasses, cups.

Clothing: Any clothing, mostly sizes small and medium please. These people come to our country with only the clothes on their backs and are not prepared for our harsh winters. Bedding: Sheets, sizes single, full, or twin please.

Saturday, February 4, 2017

Friday, February 3, 2017

ATV Use Topic of Meeting

Follow this link to the Bradford Era


EMPORIUM — Members of the Cameron County ATV/UTV Association visited the Cameron County Commissioners meeting on Thursday to report on progress made toward developing all-terrain vehicle riding opportunities throughout the county.

Approximately 23 miles of township roads have been identified for part of a trail that would connect Cameron County’s boroughs and townships for use by ATV riders, and members are attending township and borough meetings over the next few weeks to garner support for the move.

“Right now, we’re watching ATVs leave this county. They come in, drive through, and go out the other side,” said ATV Association president Jeff Snell, owner of the Bear’s Den restaurant and bar in Sterling Run. “Economic impact is a major part of this.”

Currently, members are working to connect portions of the identified route, as there are several gaps that must be filled in before the trail can run from Gibson Township, in southeastern Cameron County, to Shippen Township in the northwestern corner. If the trail is successful, members would like to see it expanded to link with trail systems in nearby counties, such as those in Elk, Potter and Clinton counties.

Snell said members are aware of the concerns of some residents, and a petition circulated and submitted to several townships. However, Snell reiterates the association is taking concerns into account during the planning phase, and the opening of an approved area for riders would eliminate a lot of the illegal riding that has been feared by opponents.

“Everyone talks about the 2 percent (of ATV riders who do not follow laws), but it’s actually 100 percent right now. Everyone is riding illegally. We want to designate and sign these roads, then we’ll deal with the 2 percent who still can’t follow the rules,” said Snell. “We love it here, too. We’re not out to ruin what we have. We’re just trying to make it better.”

Association members have been working with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR), municipal authorities and other surrounding counties’ ATV associations to determine the best course of action and to attempt to work out problems before roads are opened to ATVs. They have also spoken with township officials from areas in Elk County where ATV riding has been permitted for more than a decade, and reported that very few problems arose after the first year due to ATV riders policing their own ranks.

Commissioner Lori Reed said she personally supported the action, as it was likely to positively impact the economy in Cameron County. The commissioners are working to write up a resolution or similar motion to officially recognize the ATV association’s efforts.

In other news, the commissioners approved a bid of $8,878 submitted by Bucktail Excavators for the demolition of a former residence located at 236 West Fifth St. in Emporium Borough.

A resolution was also approved by the commissioners. The resolution authorizes the recorder of deeds to charge an additional $15 fee on deeds and mortgages, with the money to be used for the continued demolition of blighted properties in the county.

Resolution 2017-2 was also passed, transferring the lot formerly occupied by the Jasper Harris & Sons building at 26 East Fourth St. to the ownership of Emporium Borough. The move “continues the intergovernmental cooperation with the borough on blighted properties.” The commissioners stated it made good fiscal sense to transfer the property, as the borough has the equipment and employees to care for the lot.

Due to the use of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds, use of the lot is limited for the next few years.

Meanwhile, the commissioners approved an Act 13 funding application from the Cameron County School District in the amount of $7,410.

The funds will be used to install new drainage under the playground, which is used by the Family Center and children enrolled at Woodland Elementary, Pre-K Counts, IU9 Preschool and Head Start.

Also, the county was awarded a $3,778.35 safety grant to make employee safety improvements at the courthouse. The money will be used to repair downspouts and the awning over the handicap entrance, install new lighting and purchase an AED unit.

The next commissioners meeting will be held at 10 a.m. Feb. 16 at the courthouse in Emporium.

Article by Amanda Jones Bradford Era Correspondent

Cameron County School Board Meeting

Follow this link to the Bradford Era


EMPORIUM — At Thursday’s meeting, members of the Cameron County school board heard a presentation from students who recently traveled to Hawaii to perform in Pearl Harbor Day Memorial ceremonies.

Cameron County High School band director Dan Sensenig and a number of directors and staff from across the region escorted a group of students selected from area school districts to perform in the event. Sensenig was asked to form the Pennsylvania Pearl Harbor Honors Band following the successful CCHS Band trip the year prior.

“It was a real honor to be there, especially on the 75th anniversary, to represent our community, our state and our veterans,” said Sensenig.

The students presented a slide show and talked about some of the learning experiences they had while on the islands, including visiting the USS Missouri and performing in front of the memorial, touring the Dole Plantation and visiting a number of communities at the Polynesian Culture Center.

Students representing CCHS at the event were Dalton Ball, Chloe Burgett, Kaitlyn Burgett, Ann Burt, Marissa Doud, Ariel Farren, Sally Holjencin, Lia Inman, Cam Ramsey and Hannah Uber. CCHS Colorguard Advisor Maggie Sensenig also participated as part of the honors band staff.

Congratulations were also extended to four students who qualified for the PMEA District Band Festival. Students who excel at the district festival may be invited to participate in a regional festival, and can later advance to state band. This year, CCHS will be represented by Ariel Farren, Cam Ramsey, Abby Rowan and Mason Shaffer.

Kindergarten registration will be held from Feb. 27 through March 10. Principal Amy Schwab stated that it appears as though the incoming class will be similar in size to those in recent years. Most grades at Woodland Elementary have 40 or 50 students currently. Registration packets are available at the school, and have also been distributed to many early-education facilities within the county.

Superintendent Dr. Keith Wolf stated that he received a call from a concerned citizen about the qualifications of the contractor chosen to perform work at one of the Woodland Elementary School playgrounds. A representative of Losey Contracting produced documents on request that included the contractor’s state and federal identification numbers and insurance documents, paving the way for the work to be completed.

At a meeting held earlier in the day, Cameron County Commissioners approved an Act 13 request from the school that will cover the cost of the contracting bid. Commissioners approved a Marcellus Legacy Fund expenditure in the amount of $7,410 to cover the drainage work. The district will still pay $13,000 to install new mulch at the school as part of the same project.

At next week’s district business meeting, the board expects to vote on the following items: hiring of an assistant softball coach; professional leave requests; nomination of a board member to the Seneca Highlands IU9 Board; adoption of the 2017-18 school calendar; payment of district bills; acceptance of audit reports; and donation of a surplus floor scrubber to the Emporium Volunteer Fire Department.

The board may vote on additional individuals to be added to the substitute lists. Currently, the district is seeking substitute teachers, and recently initiated a pay increase to entice more people to apply for the positions. Two interested individuals had contacted the school, but one was hired to a full-time position elsewhere and the second has not rescheduled an interview that had to be cancelled.

The next meeting of the school board will be held at 7 p.m. on Feb. 9 in the high school library.

Article by Amanda Jones  Bradford Era Correspondent

James E. Markum


James E. Markum, 61, of 20489 Ccc Memorial Hwy., Emporium, PA formerly of Johnstown, PA died at Penn Highlands Elk, St. Marys, PA on Thursday (February 2, 2017) morning.

He was born March 30, 1955 in Johnstown, PA the youngest son of the late Henry and Mildred Rodky Markum. On May 21, 1993 in Winchester, VA he married Susan Summers Markum, who survives. Jim grew up in Johnstown and graduated from Greater Johnstown Vo Tech in the class of 1973. He was active in the Solomon Run Volunteer Fire Company. He moved to Emporium to work for the Cameron County School District where he recently retired. He was an avid hunter who enjoyed camping, building and woodworking.

In addition to his wife Susan Summers Markum he is survived by son, Christopher "CJ" Markum, Emporium; two brothers, Michael (Glenda) Markum and Richard (Debbie) Markum, both of Johnstown, PA; step-mother, Donna Giffin Markum, Johnstown, PA; numerous nieces, nephews, great nieces and great nephews; Aunt, Agatha Markum, Johnstown. 

He was preceded in death by his parents, Henry and Mildred Rodky Markum.

There will be No Visitation. Relatives and friends are invited to attend a Burial Service at Emmanuel Episcopal Church 144 East Fourth Street, Emporium, PA on Friday, February 10, 2017 at 1:00 PM with Father Matthew Ryan, Rector and Pastor Stephen Markum, Jims nephew, officiating. 

The family will also hold a Memorial Service at Maple Grove Church of the Brethern, 160 Palestine Road, Salix, PA 15952 on Saturday, February 11, 2017 at 4:00 PM with Pastor Stephen Markum, officiating.

In lieu of flowers memorial Contributions may be made to the Emporium Volunteer Fire Department, 419 N. Broad St., Emporium, PA 15834

Online Condolences may be placed at www.BarnettFuneralHome.net

 BARNETT FUNERAL HOME, Inc. entrusted with arrangements.

Thursday, February 2, 2017

IUP STUDENTS NAMED TO FALL 2016 DEAN’S LIST AT IUP

IUP STUDENTS NAMED TO FALL 2016 DEAN’S LIST AT IUP

INDIANA, Pa. - The following students from Cameron County have been named to the fall 2016 dean’s list at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Students achieve dean’s list status when they are full-time (12 or more credits) with a grade point average of 3.25 or higher. The full list of fall 2016 dean’s list students is available at www.iup.edu/deanslist/2016-fall.

Dean’s List students, their hometowns, majors and degrees they are seeking are: 
Emporium: Capri Noel Clark, Old West Creek Road, B.S. in Human Resource Management; 
Skylar R. Galford, Valley View Road, B.S. in Child Development and Family Relations

IUP is a member of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education.

Donald E. Hallowell

Donald E. Hallowell, 54, of 200-A East 6th St., Ext, Emporium, PA died at his residence, Emporium, PA on Wednesday (February 1, 2017) night. He was born January 4, 1963 in St. Marys, PA a son of the late Willard Hallowell and Marion Putt Hallowell.

Don graduated from Cameron County High School in the class of 1981. He worked, for over 34 years, at Motor Coil in Emporium. He enjoyed playing golf and loved being with his dog Baxter. He was a member of Cameron County Vets Club, Loyal Order of the Moose Lodge #368, Emporium and the Christabelle Club.

 He is survived by one sister, Debra Hallowell, Emporium; Brother, David "Bucket" (Kim) Hallowell, Emporium; Half-brother, Michael Hallowell, Emporium; Half-brother, Matthew (Heather) Hallowell, El Paso, TX; two nieces, Lacey (Ryan) McFadden, Janelle (Bill) Lampariello and one nephew, Shawn Hallowell.

He was preceded in death by his Father, Willard Hallowell and Mother, Marion Putt Hallowell; Grandparents, Tom and Elsie Gibbs,

The Family and friends are invited to Share in a Time of Remebrance at Miller-Raffaele Post #6221, VFW 427 East Third Street, Emporium, PA on Tuesday (February 7, 2017) from 2:00-5:00 PM. 

Burial will be in the Newton Cemetery, Emporium, PA 

Memorial Contributions may be made to Cameron County SPCA, 678 South Mountain Rd., Emporium, PA 15834

Online Condolences may be placed at www.BarnettFuneralHome.net 
 BARNETT FUNERAL HOME, Inc. entrusted with arrangements.